You're not connected to the Internet.
Galaxus Logo
Background information 32115

Thanks, Apple. It was time to bury AirPower

Apple has been quite quiet about culling its wireless charging station, AirPower. But I think the company made the right decision – and I’m going to tell you why.

My colleague Kevin Hofer recently checked if you could save more money by using a monitor with an A++ energy efficiency rating rather than a A-rated one. This was Kevin’s verdict: «You can’t really save any money with an A++.»

Energy efficiency test: how did an A++ monitor fare?
Know-howComputing

Energy efficiency test: how did an A++ monitor fare?

I need to give Kevin a hard stare at this juncture, as I don’t agree with him at all. It stands to reason that it’s hard to save money on electricity because the latter is so cheap. If people had to generate their electricity from an exercise bike, 100 watts would seem real all of a sudden. And of course, that would mean a huge step backwards in terms of convenience.

And that’s where I draw a parallel with wireless charging: the convenience factor. There’s no fiddling around with the cable. You just pop your device on the pad and it already starts charging. Given there are no more charging sockets with exposed contacts, you can get products with better waterproofing.

There are already a few wireless charging solutions and many smartphones are designed with wireless charging options. In terms of Android, induction smartphone charging has been around for some time now. Even Apple phones have had wireless charging enabled via Qi (standard) since the release of the iPhone 8.

Inefficient – especially when the battery is fully charged

The thing with induction is that electricity transmission from the charging mat to the smartphone is inefficient. The Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) had the technology investigated and the findings showed a snag with this kind of charging. According to their reports, if all smartphones in Switzerland switched to induction charging mats, it would require 30 GWh more energy than if the devices were charged with a traditional cable.

Although, that admittedly only amounts to «slightly more per mille for an average Swiss household’s yearly electricity usage», as outlined in the report from the Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy, Communications DETC(in German). Abstract in English available here. That being said, this extra amount would cover the average usage of more than 6,000 four-person households.

What the authors of the report find particularly problematic is the fact that, comparatively speaking, charging pads use a lot of energy when they’re on standby. When there is no device on the mat, it behaves similar to a conventional power supply. However, once the mat detects a device, it tries to charge it. Once the device’s battery is fully charged, the mat’s energy consumption does drop but not to the standby value permitted by law, which is 0.3 W. According to the report’s authors, the worst case scenario is that more energy is being lost than the total needed to charge the device.

Is induction an example of poor technology?

Transfer of energy via induction has been around longer than smartphones. Take electric toothbrushes, for example. They’ve long since relied on induction in a room in the house where damp is an issue. And in the kitchen, induction hobs are old hat. After a spot of research, I quickly discover that induction hobs are superior to glass-ceramic and gas stoves.

I’m confused. Is induction technology good or not? I decide to put my question to the authors of the DETC report directly and hop on a call with Marco Zahner from Fields at Work, a «spin-off» company supported by the technical and scientific Zurich university ETH.

«Induction isn’t bad or inefficient per se,» explains Marco. «For instance, transformers only work because of induction. Systems that relied on induction from the start are usually efficient,» he continues. Marco adds that inefficient systems tend to be those that had induction added afterwards, such as the smartphone example. According to Marco, the problem isn’t the charging mat. Most of the energy is in fact lost on the receiver side.

Operating principle of energy transfer using induction Image: Wikipedia)

So where did Apple fail?

Back to Apple’s wireless charging station, AirPower. It must have been a last-minute decision, as the charging pad was even depicted on the packaging for the new AirPods charging case. That surely can’t have been easy for the iPhone maker.

Why Apple decided to bury its wireless charging solution isn’t known. But what we do know is that the Californian company wanted to unveil a charging pad that featured a number of coils, which would enable users to charge several iPhones, AirPod cases or Apple Watches at once. It’s also conceivable that Apple wanted to use all these extra coils to create something that would do away with the need to position devices in an exact way on the charging mat. This would have represented a real advantage over traditional solutions.

But that’s enough of my analysis. What do the experts think caused Apple to fall at this hurdle? Marco from Fields at Work is reluctant to call it. «Most companies use the Qi reference design,» he reveals. Marco goes on to explain that it’s unlikely manufacturers will take the time and effort to change solutions or improve it with more expensive materials.

That’s where Apple was bolder than other manufacturers. «If you want to build a charging pad using a number of coils, that’s when you’re going to rapidly exceed the permitted limits for electromagnetic fields because the fields overlap,» explains electrical engineer Marco. He reckons that solutions based on several coils are generally more problematic. «It’s exponentially more difficult to build a system with a number of coils,» he clarifies. As energy «lost» in the induction process is transformed into heat, you also have to consider smartphone overheating issues.

Marco rounds up our conversation by dropping another bombshell: there are also problems with USB charging cables. «Poor USB cables have up to 1 ohm internal resistance,» he says. «The influence of this inconspicuous component is often underestimated.» Ah, that’s why it can take much longer to charge up with some cables than others. In which case, it looks like I’ve already got material for my next article. If you follow my profile, you’ll get a notification once it’s published ;).

Avatar

Aurel Stevens, Zurich

  • Chief Editor
I'm the master tamer at the flea circus that is the editorial team, a nine-to-five writer and 24/7 dad. Technology, computers and hi-fi make me tick. On top of that, I’m a rain-or-shine cyclist and generally in a good mood.

32 comments

3000 / 3000 characters

User grafadrian

Wortwitz: Appel stampft sein AirPower ein, es wird quasi beAIRdigt!

23.04.2019
User alexatolaz

Bitte bleib so wie du bist.

24.04.2019
Answer
User patrickobe1

Dieses Kabelproblem ist übrigens sehr häufig bei Raspberry PI 3 und den 3,x A Netzteilen festzustellen. Dort kann öfters mal das Kabel darüber entscheiden ob genug Strom beim PI ankommt oder aber das Blitz-Zeichen eingeblendet wird, obwohl das Netzteil genügend Leistung bringen sollte.

23.04.2019
User Natsumee

Stimmt, hatte ich gerade gestern mit einem Kabel ;(

23.04.2019
User Ajeje

Ist zwar Haarspalterei, als RasPi-Benutzer könnte es euch aber interessieren: Wenn's am Kabel liegt, dann dürfte nicht ein mangel an Strom das Problem sein, sondern die Tatsache, dass gerade wegen des hohen Strombedarfs die Spannung am Gerät zu tief wird

24.04.2019
Answer
User endstation-net

In einer Zeit in der wir alle genötigt werden in jeglichen Bereichen des Lebens auf die Energieeffizienz zu schauen ist so etwas wie das Induktionsladen ein rieser Affront gegenüber uns allen.

Hier kann man mit sehr sehr sehr sehr sehr wenig Aufwand die Möglichkeit einen vergleichsweise grossen Effekt (auch langfristig) zu erreichen.

Das Prinzip des Ladens ist zwar sehr angenehm, aber der Preis im Rahmen der heutigen Umstände ist zu hoch. Ich hoffe, dass in den nächsten Jahren sich eine bessere Technik durchsetzt. Persönlich werde ich erst zu so einem System greifen, wenn der Wirkungsgrad grösser als 90% ist, genau wie bei meinen Haushaltsgeräten.

23.04.2019
User SwissDarky

30 GWh tönt nach verdammt viel, gerechnet durch die 10 Millionen Smartphones ergibt dies aber lediglich 3 kWh pro Smartphone im Jahr, was einer Verlustleistung von 0.8 Watt entspricht - ist dies wirklich so schlimm, wie du es hier darstellst? Dafür ist es erheblich bequemer, als immer "am Draht" zu hängen.

23.04.2019
User Aurel Stevens

Es ist tatsächlich nicht viel: ein oder wenige Promille des HH-Stromverbrauchs. Da gibt es auf jeden Fall andere Dinge, wo man viel mehr Energie sparen könnte. Es ist die Relation, die mich irre dünkt: 30 GWh, weil wir 1 – 2 Mal pro Tag 5 Sekunden sparen, um ein Kabel einzustecken.

23.04.2019
User StaubM11

30 GWh sind nicht zu unterschätzen nur weil man kein Kabel einstecken muss/will. Das ist immerhin fast die gemittelte Jahresproduktion eines kleineren Wasserkraftwerkes.
Die Feldkopplung dieser induktiven Ladegeräte ist nun mal nicht so grossartig, und dafür pro Handy als Beispiel 3h Staubsaugen zu "verschwenden" pro Jahr wäre schon merkwürdig.

(Blöde) Frage: Sind es dann auch wirklich alle 10 Mio. Smartphones, welche drahtlos geladen werden? Ansonsten stellt sich in Frage, ob man alle Smartphones in diese Statistik miteinbeziehen will.

23.04.2019
User Aurel Stevens

@StaubM11 es ist eine Hochrechnung im Auftrag des Bundesamts für Energie «Was wäre, wenn...»

23.04.2019
User SwissDarky

Ich habe nochmals kurz nachgerechnet: Mein Galaxy S7 hat eine Akku-Kapazität von 11.55 Wh, was im Jahr bei rund 80%-iger Ausnutzung einem Energieverbrauch von rund 3.4 kWh entspricht. Ich gebe es zu, ich habe das Problem definitiv unterschätzt, da die Verlustenergie vom Induktionsladen dem Gesamtverbrauch entspricht - Aber wie viel ist besser ist es, das Smartphone via USB-Kabel anzuschliessen? Ich denke, auch in diesen Billigkabeln muss mit viel Verlustwärme gerechnet werden.

23.04.2019
User StaubM11

Billigkabel sind so eine Sache für sich.. falls diese weniger Litzen als ein gutes Kabel haben, steigt ja der Widerstand pro Längeneinheit. Bei älteren 5V 0.5-0.8A Ladegeräten entsteht dadurch nicht riesige Spannungsabfälle, aber ein billiges 5m Chinakabel entspricht u.U. nicht der USB Vorgabe von 5% Spannungsabfall. Bei höheren Ladeströmen wird die Kabellänge und der höhere Innenwiderstand eher noch problematischer. Einerseits braucht der Handyakku eine gewisse Spannung (plusminus 4.5V sind ok), andererseits verbratet man unnötig Energie. Als Beispiel ein 24 AWG (Amerikanische Kodierung von Drahtdurchmesser, musste es selber Googlen :) ) hat einen Längenwiderstand von ca. 84 mOhm/m, ein schlechteres 28 AWG hat ca. 212 mOhm/m. Nehmen wir einen Ladestrom von 2 A an und eine Kabellänge von 1m. Dies ergibt einen Spannungsabfall von 0.336 V, respektive 0.851 V (2x Kabellänge) und somit einer Verlustleistung von 0.672W oder 1.7 W. Ich habe hier mal einfachheitshalber Kontaktwiderstände ignoriert. Hoffe mal ich habe keinen Denkfehler gemacht.
Kurze Kabel mit hohem (Stromlitzen-) Durchmesser sind also besser. Bei einer angenommenen Perfekten Ladeleistung (5V à 2A) von 10W sind 1.7W eher viel.
Natürlich kann man noch ewigs viel ins Detail gehen mit Ladecharakteristika von Akkus etc..
Kann auch sein dass bei solchen Kabeln das Handy gar nicht erst lädt.. :)
Aber ja, will damit eigentlich sagen, dass USB Ladekabel ein ziemlicher Zirkus von Ladeverhalten sind, da lohnen sich die 10-20 Fr. sparen bei chinesischen Händlern oft nicht..

23.04.2019
Answer
User Anonymous

Das Resultat von Kevin Hofers Artikel zu A++ Geräten basiert auf einem Strompreis von 7-9Rp./kWh.
Das mag für einen Industriekunden gelten, aber nicht für die Zielgruppe hier auf Digitec.ch.
Realistischer wäre das Doppelte, inkl. Netzgebühr usw., leider hat er alle Kommentare dazu ignoriert.
Aber schön zu sehen, dass Ihr Euch gegenseitig herausfordert.

25.04.2019
User einkaufen@lammli

Innenwiderstand bei USB Kabel- ich freue mich schon darauf! Ich besitze ein kleines USB Volt/Amperemeter und ein Gerät zur Simulation von verschiedener Ladeelektroniken (UM25C/HD35) und bin überrascht, wie gross dieses Thema vom Laden über USB sein kann.

23.04.2019
User dthueler

Also meine Smart wach (Matrix Power watch) kommt ohne ladegrät aus und wird durch körperwärme geladen, das Teil hat noch nie Strom aus der Steckdose gesehen
Und als Ausgleich für mein Smartphone habe ich eine Solar Zelle an der Steckdose die erst noch mehr produziert als mein Smartphone konsumiert

24.04.2019
User MCeeRieni

Also ich muss sagen, ich finde es schon etwas schade.
Klar ist, dass so ein Ladepad Strom verbraucht, wenn man es nicht benutzt. Das Gleiche passiert bei dem Ladekabel für die Apple Watch. Und ja der Energieverlust ist da.

Aber man kann auch eine andere Seite betrachten. Die Drahtlosladetechnik hat den Vorteil, dass es alle Hersteller zu einheitlichen Ladegeräten verhilft. Man hat also ein Ladegerät und kann gleichermaßen Android, iPhone oder sonstige Geräte laden.
Wenn ich daran denke wie oft ein Kabel kaputt geht, weil der Stecker kaputt geht oder das Kabel reisst.

Ich denke alleine die Tatsache, dass Kabel durch diese Technik weniger kaputt gehen, das Metalle und andere Stoffe spart und diese mit verschiedenen Geräten einsetzbar sind, spart auch hier Ressourcen. Und wenn man sich Gedanken wegen dem Mehrverbrauch macht, sollte auch darüber reden, dass man auch Solartechnik einsetzen kann, um das wieder auszugleichen.

Ich finde es nicht gut, dass die Technik nicht kommt.

24.04.2019
User hofmann-marly

Ehrlich und verständlich abgefasst, geht nicht jedem Marketing-hype auf den Leim.

21.05.2019
User f.zehnder

Ich musste bereits 2 Telefone ersetzen, weil der USB Stecker nicht mehr korrekt funktionierte, weil zu viele verschiedene Stecker ( 2 Autos, Büro und Home ) zum aufladen verwendet wurden. USB 2 konnte man ja versuchen links oder rechts herum einzustecken ... Das hat mich und die Umwelt mehr gekostet als ich nun mit dem Wireless aufladen vergeude obwohl ich einen USB 3 Stecker habe.

05.06.2019
User Qwerty

Danke für den interessanten Artikel!

Weiss Jemand von euch ob Wireless Charging irgendwelche gesundheitlichen Schäden verursachen kann? Ich denke da vorallem an die elektromagnetischen Felder, welche man die ganze Nacht neben dem Kopf hat...

23.04.2019
User Scotty1928

Hier ist ein Artikel dazu:

Ich würde zu behaupten wagen, dass, solange du nicht auf einen Herzschrittmacher o.ä. angewiesen bist und das Qi-Pad nicht als Kopfkissen benutzt, dadurch keine Probleme entstehen. Die Leistung ist gering und nimmt auf Distanz stark ab.

23.04.2019
User Scotty1928

techwalls.com/wireless-char...

23.04.2019
User Aurel Stevens

Steht gleich im Résumé des verlinkten Berichts (Zitat): «Die Resultate zeigen, dass die Basisgrenzwerte nicht überschritten werden: betreffend Energieabsorption (SAR) liegen sie einen Faktor 1‘000, betreffend elektrischer Feldstärke im Gewebe um einen Faktor 10 darunter. Aus gesundheitlicher Sicht sind die Anlagen deshalb unbedenklich.»

23.04.2019
User productiveNetwork

Da die offiziellen Grenzwerte nicht schützen sollten die Richtwerte SBM-2015 des Baubiologen-Verbandes genommen werden, diese Werte sind in Theorie und Praxis gesichert. Hier geht man von <10nT NF-Magnetfeld aus, darunter sind keinerlei gesundheitliche Effekte bekannt. Diese werden von Qi-Ladestationen mit ca. 0.5-1m Abstand erreicht. Deshalb sollte diese weder auf dem Nachttisch noch sonst irgendwo stehen, wo man sich länger aufhält.

24.04.2019
Answer
User emiforlin

Ich lade mein handy nur per induktion. Hat einen ganz einfachen grund....wenn ich 2 jahrelang jeden tag die usb bichse vewende geht die eimfach kaputt. Abnutzung. Da interssieren mich die 2fr mehr strom im jahr nicht wirklich. So eine usb buchse kann sehr teuer werden je nach gerät selbst wenn man das selber macht.

25.04.2019
User bebby

Fairerweise müsste der Autor den Stromverlust vergleichen mit der Energie, die benötigt wird, um diese unzähligen USB Kabel zu produzieren. Meine offiziellen Applekabel halten im Schnitt ca. 1 Jahr, bis sie anfangen kaputtzugehen, weil wieder mal zuviel daran herumgerissen wird. Ein richtiges Verschleissteil im Gegensatz zu den guten alten Stromkabeln.

24.04.2019
User darnok16

Eben nicht am Kabel « herumreißen ». Meine halten ewig und ich brauche nur eines um 3 devices abwechselnd zu laden...

24.04.2019
User bebby

Das klappt aber nicht bei einer Grossfamilie mit mehreren ipads, etc., die gleichzeitig und 24/7 parat sein müssen. :-) Hier wäre ein Induktionsraum perfekt, wo sich die Geräte selber aufladen, egal wo sie liegen. Tesla hat ja bereits gezeigt gehabt, dass das theoretisch möglich wäre. Oder noch besser aufladen durch den eigenen Körper.

24.04.2019
User Ajeje

Bei Wireless-Ladung muss mehr Ware produziert werden. Beim kabelgebundenen Laden haben wir ein Steckernetzteil, ein Kabel und eine Buchse. Bei der induktiven Ladung haben wir das alles auch, irgendwie muss ja die Ladefläche auch zu Strom kommen. Dazu kommen die Spulen.
Was die Kabel betrifft: Mir ist noch nie eins kaputt gegangen, und die sind bei mir z.T. seit 10 Jahren im Einsatz

24.04.2019
User endstation-net

Vor allem brauch es um ein Qi-Pad zu betreiben ein Kabel plus das Qi-Pad. Daher ist das Argument mit den Herstellungsaufwand und damit dem Einfluss auf die Umwelt hinfällig.

24.04.2019
User bebby

Sehe ich nicht so - ein Kabel, dass nur einmal eingesteckt wird, nutzt sich weniger stark ab, als eines dass täglich aus- und eingesteckt wird. Nicht alle gehen so sanft um mit Kabeln wie Ajeje. :-) Bei mir zu Hause wird das Stromkabel oft als Seil benutzt, um das ipad herauszuholen. Nicht dass ich das unterstütze, aber verhindern lässt sich das nicht.
Ehrlich gesagt wäre ich einfach froh, wenn das Kabelgewirr endlich Geschichte wäre. Wir haben überall wireless, nur beim Strom sind wir noch nicht soweit. Meine Hoffnung liegt momentan bei der funktionalen Kleidung, da ist ja einiges geplant in diese Richtung. Ein Handy, dass sich automatisch auflädt, wenn man es in die Jacke steckt.

25.04.2019
Answer